Surf board – E Surfboard Racks http://www.esurfboardracks.com/ Mon, 19 Jul 2021 02:15:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://www.esurfboardracks.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-5.png Surf board – E Surfboard Racks http://www.esurfboardracks.com/ 32 32 Saint-Augustin Surf Museum documents over 100 years of history https://www.esurfboardracks.com/saint-augustin-surf-museum-documents-over-100-years-of-history/ https://www.esurfboardracks.com/saint-augustin-surf-museum-documents-over-100-years-of-history/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:37:10 +0000 https://www.esurfboardracks.com/saint-augustin-surf-museum-documents-over-100-years-of-history/ The mission of the St. Augustine Historical Society is to preserve the historic past of this historic city. Its archives are filled with documents, photos and maps dating from the founding of the city in 1565. But the goal of the organization is more than to archive documents – it also collects and presents the […]]]>

The mission of the St. Augustine Historical Society is to preserve the historic past of this historic city. Its archives are filled with documents, photos and maps dating from the founding of the city in 1565. But the goal of the organization is more than to archive documents – it also collects and presents the history of St. Augustine to the public.

“In 2017, the staff and I were tasked with coming up with ideas to attract an audience who otherwise might not be interested in history or the historical society,” said Magen Wilson, executive director of St. Augustine Historical Society, “and then after reading a 1915 article in the St. Augustine Evening Record that talked about surfing in St. Augustine, we thought, well, we have over a century of surfing history. here, and it’s really cool. So we started doing oral history interviews with people who had surfed in the 60s and 70s. “


Source link

]]>
https://www.esurfboardracks.com/saint-augustin-surf-museum-documents-over-100-years-of-history/feed/ 0
Minnesota group strives to bring more diversity to wake surfing https://www.esurfboardracks.com/minnesota-group-strives-to-bring-more-diversity-to-wake-surfing/ https://www.esurfboardracks.com/minnesota-group-strives-to-bring-more-diversity-to-wake-surfing/#respond Sat, 17 Jul 2021 03:54:46 +0000 https://www.esurfboardracks.com/minnesota-group-strives-to-bring-more-diversity-to-wake-surfing/ Minnesota group strives to bring more diversity to wake surfing With the Minnesota Wake Surf Championship underway on Lake Minnetonka this weekend, one group is hoping to bring new faces to the sport. MINNETONKA, Minnesota (FOX 9) – With the Minnesota Wake Surf Championship underway on Lake Minnetonka this weekend, one group is hoping to […]]]>

With the Minnesota Wake Surf Championship underway on Lake Minnetonka this weekend, one group is hoping to bring new faces to the sport.

“Wake surfing is so much fun,” said Shawn Taher of Inner City Surf. “Going out on the lake and out of town. It is very pleasant sometimes.”

That’s why Shawn Taher started Inner City Surf to bring more diversity to wake surfing and other water sports in general. So far, his non-profit organization has run two clinics on Lake Minnetonka for children from underserved communities, where they can learn how to catch a wave pulled 25 to 30 feet behind a boat.

“I think the kids can go out and do something they’re not used to doing normally and they can see if there’s a sport they like,” Taher said.

Taher says he came up with the idea about a year ago when more and more Minnesotans started hitting the water as one of the few things they could do during quarantine. He says he noticed a gap in diversity because not everyone has the opportunity to participate in the sport.

“It’s an access issue,” Taher said. “A problem with perspective. There is a problem with socializing about being uncomfortable around water and we need to fix it. We need to bring our community together.”

At first, the children go surfing with a coach to see if they can get back on their feet. However, the ultimate goal is for them to let go of the rope and make a splash by doing an activity that they could enjoy for the rest of their life.

“Our rule, as you well know at Inner City Surf, is that everyone rides a wave,” concluded Taher.


Source link

]]>
https://www.esurfboardracks.com/minnesota-group-strives-to-bring-more-diversity-to-wake-surfing/feed/ 0
Pro Surfer Kolohe Andino interview https://www.esurfboardracks.com/pro-surfer-kolohe-andino-interview/ https://www.esurfboardracks.com/pro-surfer-kolohe-andino-interview/#respond Thu, 15 Jul 2021 04:37:47 +0000 https://www.esurfboardracks.com/?p=287 He enters the gym wearing one flip-flop. Kolohe Andino clatters across the hardwood on crutches. His right foot and ankle are encased in a black pneumatic boot. A two-hour physical therapy session is about to begin. It’s the final day of April and Andino is 10 days out from surgery he had to repair a […]]]>

He enters the gym wearing one flip-flop. Kolohe Andino clatters across the hardwood on crutches. His right foot and ankle are encased in a black pneumatic boot.

A two-hour physical therapy session is about to begin. It’s the final day of April and Andino is 10 days out from surgery he had to repair a grade 3 ankle sprain and some related cartilage damage. Sitting on the treatment table, here at a facility near his lifelong home in San Clemente, California, he removes the boot and unwraps an Ace bandage to reveal a tidy vertical scar and three small incisions. “I wish my ankles were this size all the time,” Andino jokes, pointing to the swelling. “That would be solid.”

Then it’s down to business. Andino has for years trained like a bulldog, obsessive even by professional athlete standards, and this PT session is no different. A certain groundbreaking competition is scheduled to begin on July 25 at Tsurigasaki Beach, located 90 minutes east of Tokyo, and the 27-year-old surfer plans to be ready. Andino and his rehab team have determined the date when he should be able to get back in the water—“June 17 is the target for that,” he offers, speaking like that’s in indelible ink.

“My surfing is an expression of my life,” says Andino.

© Trevor Moran

The rehab does not look fun or relaxing. The best elite athletes are like normal people, in that they eat breakfast and brush their teeth like the rest of us, but they do not train like mortals. Andino’s hard cast was removed two days ago and he’s already doing dynamic movements—like a super clam, a complicated side plank with glute extensions— while wearing Blood Flow Restriction bands, which limit blood flow into his right leg to intensify the workout. Then he does a block of dynamic neuromuscular stabilization, a rehabilitation technique that rewires the body’s movement patterns. There are electronic pulses and massage guns and even toe yoga. “You know you’re super fit when moving your toes makes you sweat,” Andino says, laughing before getting philosophical. “It’s good to have some structure and be doing shit, but it’s so far from landing airs in the flats. Surfing is literally how I normally express myself.”

Moderation is not Andino’s default setting. For years he’s operated more like a light switch than a dimmer— always on at full power. But the pandemic has helped Andino, who’s been in competitive contest mode for most of his life, to accelerate his journey to a certain kind of enlightenment. Last November, for instance, Andino, who long has harbored ambivalence about his sport’s spirit in the age of Instagram, hastily organized a surf trip to Indonesia with four buddies that has turned into a big film project about friendship, the soul of surfing and endless perfect waves. He’s found more bandwidth to see how his surfing life, while anchored around competitive grit, is sustained by other elements of surf culture and creative interests, and in turn, that has deepened his love for it. Even his injury and surgery, poorly timed to say the least, pose an opportunity to reset.

“I’ve realized I’m happiest when I’m outside surfing. Why not lean into that?”

“It’s been a weird year,” he will observe later that day. “I really had a chance to deep-dive into myself and realized that I spent a decade weighing my happiness or success on how I did in my last event. And then when there were no events, I realized that I just actually love surfing, going on a road trip with no camera, or teaching my wife how to surf, or trying to learn how to shape boards, or filming my friends surfing—all of this rad stuff.”

Tokyo and the resumption of the World Surf League’s Championship Tour still beckon. And one of the hardest-working surfers on the planet will surely get back to eight-hour sessions and 4 a.m. workouts. But something fundamental has shifted, something that Andino thinks will help him perform in cutthroat comps. “I’m ready to compete in a place of joy and lightness, with a sense that I’m not scared to lose,” he says. “I realize I’m happiest when I’m outside surfing. Why not really lean into that?”

“I’m happiest when I’m outside surfing. Why not lean into that?”

“I’m happiest when I’m outside surfing. Why not lean into that?”

© Jose Mandojana

Andino has a lifelong connection to San Clemente, a beachside city that sits at the southernmost edge of the Los Angeles metro area. He was born here, in a local hospital that no longer exists, and though surfing has taken him all over the world, it remains his home base. “Yeah, I have a lot of roots here,” he says.

His father, Dino, grew up here and became a local legend—“even now he’s still the kingpin of San Clemente,” Kolohe says. Dino was a national champion in the ’80s and a successful pro in the ’90s. When Kolohe was just 2, Dino would take him out on a board, the toddler lying right under his father’s chest, as they carved turns in the famously friendly surf at San Onofre State Beach. “I’ve truly been around surfing my whole life,” the second-generation pro observes. Dino has been his coach since the beginning.

Pro surfing is packed with young men and women who were nudged (or pushed) by a dad to greatness, but no one else had a lifelong apprenticeship like Andino. After his retirement from the pro ranks, Dino transitioned to a job in the industry and often brought his son along on the pro circuit. Between the ages of 10 and 14, Kolohe says, he lived the life of “a mini pro surfer.” He went with his dad to events on the East Coast, in Europe, in Hawaii, and had an all-access pass to experiences that other youngsters could only dream about. “I got to hang out with all of my favorite surfers and go free surfing with them and all that stuff,” he says.

Kolohe Andino walks along the beach the spot where Pipeline breaks off Oahu’s North Shore.

Andino walks along Ehukai Beach Park in Oahu’s North Shore.

© Trevor Moran

From early on, it was obvious that the kid was not destined to be a tourist out there with the heavy hitters. He won his first contest in 2002, at the age of 8. Three years later he won his first national title—yes, there’s actually a category called Mini Grom—and then went on to win junior national titles in the next four years. In the end he won nine NSSA titles, more than anyone in history. In 2009 he was favored to win the junior title but instead at 15 became the youngest Open Men’s champion in history. At an age when many kids are still collecting an allowance, Andino had top-shelf companies battling one another to sponsor him.

Andino qualified for the WSL’s Championship Tour— the pinnacle of the sport—at the age of 18, buoyed with confidence and a stable of corporate backers and a lifetime of grooming for that moment. It didn’t go as he planned. “I just got my ass kicked for the first four years,” he says. “It was weird.”

Along the way he learned that contest surfing on the CT is like a heavyweight prize fight every time. “Surfers are normally pretty chill people but out there we’re literally trying to rip each other’s heads off,” he says.

When asked to describe what it’s like out there, surfing heats against other top pros, Andino breaks his competitors into categories. Some guys he knows he’s going to beat, and other guys who are really good act like they’re out there alone, which can be unnerving. But, he says, the very best guys “put out this really thick thickening-of-the- air aura. When I surf against Kelly [Slater] and [Gabriel] Medina, we’ll be this close together, and the air actually feels heavy and dry.”

Andino carving on a good day at Rocky Point on the North Shore.

Andino carving on a good day at Rocky Point on the North Shore.

© Trevor Moran

Andino rose to the challenge. He already had an intense work ethic and a demanding father-coach and felt the weight of expectations from within himself and those around him. Andino went all in with every aspect of his preparation. “I hate to lose,” he says. “So I try to be sure I did A through Z to be ready.” Andino says he tries to “train a lot and eat perfect”—which in his case is a perpetually mindful paleo-keto diet of vegetables and a wide mix of lean protein. He drinks zero alcohol, regularly surfs full-day sessions and works out at all hours. “The last year I was on tour I was waking up at 3:30 in the morning and getting an hour and a half of working out before the sun was up,” he says. “It gets a little crazy sometimes.”

Andino admits that at times his approach has led to overtraining injuries, but it’s also true that his obsessive work lifted his performance on the Championship Tour to a rarefied level. He had a breakthrough year in 2017, with four top-three finishes in CT events. And in 2019, the last full year of CT competition before the pandemic, Andino finished top five in seven of 11 events, earning second or third place results four times. This consistent excellence earned him an Olympic bid.

“It’s a really cool feeling to go into an event and feel like I’m in incredible shape,” he says. “I get this ecstasy-like machinery feeling where I know I’m ready. That’s a rad confidence thing, going into an event knowing that I’m not going to fuck up any wave I get. When I’m in incredible shape, I surf every wave at a really high level.”

“Winning isn’t like a magical Band-Aid that just makes you relaxed and happier.”

Even when discussing his training triumphs and breakthrough success, Andino is quick to note that he has never won a CT event. He obviously has a deep hunger to win, but he has earned some perspective on this the hard way. “Back when I was getting my ass kicked, I would do just about anything to finish in the top five,” he says. “But once I finished top five a couple times, I realized I still felt the same—I still felt this hunger to win. I was still living and dying by each result.”

He recalls a conversation with his good friend, John John Florence, who has won CT events seven times. “And after he finally won, he told me that he was surprised— like OK, that’s it?” Andino says. “Winning isn’t like a magical Band-Aid that just makes you relaxed and happier, or changes your life outside of the sport. You still have ups and downs with your family.”

Eventually he saw what needed to change. “Surfing heats can be so weird, because you can do everything perfect and it just goes out the window with the waves that you get, or the person you draw, or what kind of waves he got,” he says. “It’s really hit or miss. And it’s hard to frame your happiness around something that you have no control over. It was eating away inside of me, and I realized that there’s no way I can surf my best in that frame of mind. So I’ve been trying to flip that script.”

Andino pauses for a moment. “Surfing competitively has taught me a lot about life,” he says. “You have to deal with whatever the fuck gets dealt to you.”

Andino enjoying a non-competitive time on the water in the Maldives.

Andino enjoying a non-competitive time on the water in the Maldives.

© Ryan Miller

At home, Andino has his right foot propped up on a table in a second-floor room he proudly calls his man cave. The shelves are lined with what may be the world’s largest collection of Los Angeles Dodgers bobbleheads. A sweet collection of vintage camera equipment—including a medium-format Hasselblad and a 35 mm movie camera— sit in a jumble on the desk. His two dogs, Dooley and Levi, wander in and out of the room with various objects in their mouths, including a sofa cushion. There is a big TV, where Andino and his wife, Maddie, cheer on their beloved Dodgers.

Over by the couch sits a large dry-erase board. It’s the storyboard to the surf film that Andino planned, funded, helped film and is now lovingly editing. It charts out the character quirks and arcs, the plot points and backstory and the tube-riding exploits of the film’s five key characters— Andino and four longtime friends from San Clemente.

The documentary, titled Reckless Isolation and set to be released in September, is a throwback to surf films of another era. It’s action-heavy, with a soundtrack that blends soulful folk with unrelenting screamo. But beneath all the footage of dudes surfing one perfect tube after another to thrumming guitars, there’s a quiet story about friendship and adventure—a story of what surfing once was and can still be.

“Surfing has become an Instagram sport, which is really just weird because in the past it was on the forefront of fashion and surf-bum counterculture and rock ’n’ roll—truly adventurous things,” Andino says. “I grew up with surf films—I got to see my heroes on the big screen. It was big and loud and it was a huge party.”

Late in 2020, Andino learned that Indonesia had opened up, and before anyone else jumped on it he and four childhood buddies jumped on a plane. They spent 20 days on a boat in the Mentawai Islands. “There were no phones, I got to invite my best friends, there were five or six incredible swells and I got to make a movie,” he says, offering a sort of elevator pitch. “It’s hard to explain just how good the waves were.”

Indeed, the film is a chronicle of barrel drunkenness, as Andino and his friends celebrate the intoxication of dropping into one perfect tube after another. There is playful shit-talking on the boat, an epic bonfire, the simple but profound joys of friends enjoying something special together. It’s like a dream, only with cooler music.

It was an entirely new—and entirely restorative—experience for the veteran comp surfer turned rookie filmmaker. “It was super exciting to watch my friends surf and try to make them look as big and good as possible,” he says, noting that everyone gets equal screen time in the film. “I try not to be like the big chest-pounding guy because it’s just not my style. It’s not the way I was raised. I just kept thinking how I’m in love with surf movies and had all my friends in Indo! The whole thing is super rad, something the surfing community needs.”

Kolohe Andino on a Pipeline last December.

Andino surfs in an early round at the Billabong Pipe Masters.

© Trevor Moran

Andino is grunting at the gym, getting assessed and worked over by a trainer. The facility is in the headquarters of the surf-inspired sock-and-underwear brand Stance. Classic rock fills the loftlike space as a gentle breeze blows through open garage doors. Everyone present seems to be holding a winning physiological lottery ticket; during a 30-second break in the action Andino says a quick hi to NFL quarterback Kyle Allen, tossing a few wisecracks at his buddy about the ongoing draft.

There are a bunch of reasons for Andino to be at the gym so soon after his surgery. He needs to make sure his leg and core muscles don’t atrophy. It’s a chance for him to retool his body and fix some chronic imbalances. And perhaps above all, it’s a critical piece of self-care for an athlete who is used to long, hard hours in the water. “It’s an important thing to keep an elite athlete mentally engaged,” says his trainer.

“It’s stress release.”

There’s something comically impressive in watching an injured top professional athlete perform challenging rehab exercises to classic rock. His shoulder mobility is assessed to the Who’s “Baba O’Riley.” In seconds he masters this 90-90 mobility drill, which involves a sequence of six different head-to-toe movements, to “Sweet Emotion.” He does a series of short recovery pulls of a heavy rope draped over a squat rack, grunting along with “Come Together.” “This is like serious glory rock,” he notes. But putting that one quip aside, Andino is pretty damn serious, picking up, refining and perfecting movements more quickly than most people could possibly do.

“He’s an amazing athlete,” his physical therapist told me earlier. “You can give him a little cue and he can change immediately.”

Kolohe Andino shown surfing in the Maldives last October.

“I love to surf and get barreled,” says Andino.

© Erick Proost

Later in the day, Andino recaps the mishap that landed him in PT. It was in February. Two months earlier he’d come into the first post-COVID event in terrific shape—at the iconic Pipeline on Oahu’s North Shore—and lost in an early round. But around Valentine’s Day, Pipeline was really firing, so he decided to fly out and stay with John John Florence and surf the hell out of the world’s most famous barrel for five days. “I mean I love to surf and get barreled, so this is the best wave in the world,” he says. “So I was psyching to get over there.”

The first day there he surfed for six hours in the morning, and then, right in character, he went back out for an afternoon session.“I was tired,” he says. “I contemplated it for a while, and I decided to go out.”

At first it seemed like a great decision. “The first wave I got was one of the best waves I’ve ever gotten out there,” Andino says. “It was a big barrel and I was just in the thing and it was sick. I was really stoked. On a big day, Pipeline can get crowded and hard to get a good wave. And it’s gnarly and people are getting hurt. It’s a yard sale of emotions out there.”

“When I’m surfing, I want to be relaxed in between maneuvers, and then fierce when it counts.”

But just as he was coming out of this perfect barrel, Andino says, the wave bent out to sea ever so slightly and he got clamped. For a moment, fueled by the full force of heavy water, his board was pushed up while his body was pushed down. “For a second it felt like I broke my leg but then I knew I didn’t,” he says, noting that he actually surfed a few waves after that.

The next day his ankle didn’t hurt or seem swollen and Pipeline was still pumping, so he went out again. “And it happened again,” he says with a sigh. “So yeah, like my worst nightmare—overdoing something 10 times. Every time I get hurt, it’s because I oversurf when I’m tired. It’s the eighth hour of the day and I’m still going way hard.”

For a while after that trip, Andino hoped that rest would clear up the issue. But a few weeks later he went on a bike ride, the pain was too much and the ankle swelled up; he knew he needed to see a specialist. Thus began his sprint to get ready for Tokyo.

Andino’s gym workout ends with these core-mobility movements that look like three complicated moves pasted together. The trainer explains the new sequence once and the surfer just nails it with perfect form.

When asked how he perfected it so quickly, Andino shrugs. “Surfing is a dynamic thing,” he says, as “Dust in the Wind” soars in the background. “To do it really well you need to have a feeling of what’s happening with your whole body—and then posturize and compartmentalize individual body parts.”

Kolohe Andino pictured here during a photoshoot in April 2021.

Andino offers a big hello to an old friend at San Onofre State Beach.

© Jose Mandojana

Andino, crutches and all, is back at San Onofre, the spot where his father first took him out on a board when he was 2. It’s hardly the local break for heavy hitters—that would be Trestles, just a couple clicks to the north—but Andino is in his element. He throws shakas and boisterous good cheer at surfing acquaintances he sees and asks a few random passersby who shaped their boards. Over four hours of hanging at the beach, he looks at social media exactly zero times. He’s more keen to stare out at the water and watch kids cruising on longboards.

He has small waves on his mind. Andino thinks the conditions at Tsurigasaki Beach in July will likely look a lot less like Pipeline and a lot more like San Onofre. “I don’t think people realize how small it could be,” he says. “I think it could catch people off guard.” To that end, he’s framing his downtime and rehabilitation therapy as an opportunity to lose some weight and get even whippier on his board.

“The waves that we ride on the tour are normally big, windy, chunky waves where you have to weigh down your body and your board and sink into your maneuvers,” he observes. “Either that or it’s like big sections in Europen where you have to like hit and control a big wave coming at you like boom! So you have to be super strong and heavy-footed; whereas Tokyo will be a whole ’nother game. I’m at like 175 right now and my usual fighting weight for surfing is like 170. But it would be huge if I could get to 165 so I can get up on those waves and generate speed and do a couple of maneuvers.”

In a word, Andino is stoked about Tokyo. “It’s a rad opportunity for me,” he says. “I think if I was not in it, I would be super bummed.” San Clemente sits on the northern edge of Camp Pendleton, a massive Marine base that spans 195 square miles. Andino says that he now sees how this shaped his excitement to represent his country in Tokyo. “I grew up next to Pendleton and my whole life I’ve mixed it up with Marines and people who are stationed here and their kids,” he says. “I’m a very patriotic person.”

“I love my country. To be able to fly the flag and the colors means the world to me.”

Andino lights up. “I can’t tell you how excited I am to get the merch and all that cool shit,” he says. “I love my country and to be able to fly the flag and the colors means the world to me.”

If you want to get Andino fired up, ask him what he thinks about surfing and Instagram. “Surfing feels very much like a social media sport right now and it can seem very corny,” he says with enough animation to stir one of his dogs out of a nap. “Surfing is not supposed to be like bottle flipping on TikTok. Surfing is real—real surfers work real jobs and they’re core and they yell at kooks when they’re in the way like it’s a hardcore thing. Surfers are rock ’n’ roll in the water and they’re at the forefront of fashion. It’s supposed to have depth and darker elements.”

Andino is rock ’n’ roll in the water. There’s no doubt about that. Now, like the soundtrack to his film, he’s trying to blend some soulful folk with the screamo. “They say how you do anything is how you do all things,” he says. “My surfing is like that. It’s an expression of my life. With my surfing career, the trying was never the hard part. The fire and the passion were never the hard part. The hard part is getting me to relax and to let things happen. So, yeah, I’ve worked a lot on that, being relaxed and having that kind of strength from the inside and not the artificial strength.”

When he’s surfing at his best, Andino looks simultaneously tranquil and explosive, seeming at once spontaneous and deliberate. Through this fluidity and duality, he expresses himself on a surfboard. “When I’m surfing, I want to be relaxed in between maneuvers,” he says, “and then fierce when it counts—like bang!”

Andino surfs Off the Wall on the North Shore last December.

Andino surfs Off the Wall on the North Shore last December.

© Trevor Moran

Andino is representing a lot of people when he surfs. He’s out there because his dad pushed him out there and helped mold him. He’s out there repping for the rest of his family and brands that have been behind him a long time and his San Clemente buddies and everyone who knew he’d be a big deal 15 years ago. And this summer he’ll be out there at Tsurigasaki Beach, in his red, white, and blue merch, representing his country.

All these things matter, but they are not why Andino has spent his life surfing, obsessively trying to work a little harder and do a little bit better. “All this has not been for anyone else,” he says, trying to explain one side of the coin, his long hard grind toward true excellence. “It was just because I wanted to do good. I wanted to feel worthy within myself.”

And on the other side sits something bigger than his competitive fire, even larger than self-expression or joy. “You can probably tell from spending a little time with me how much I love surfing,” he says. “I’m fascinated to learn more in a noncompetitive way—surfing has given me so much that I just want to know as much as I can about it. Surfing is just like my life.”


Source link

]]>
https://www.esurfboardracks.com/pro-surfer-kolohe-andino-interview/feed/ 0
Weekend Events in Stuart, Vero, PSL, Fort Pierce, more https://www.esurfboardracks.com/weekend-events-in-stuart-vero-psl-fort-pierce-more/ https://www.esurfboardracks.com/weekend-events-in-stuart-vero-psl-fort-pierce-more/#respond Wed, 14 Jul 2021 21:00:13 +0000 https://www.esurfboardracks.com/weekend-events-in-stuart-vero-psl-fort-pierce-more/ Five on Friday: weekend events at Stuart, Vero, PSL, Fort Pierce, more News Indian River County Martin County St. Lucie County Sports Photos / Videos Obituaries E-Edition Legal Notice Raise a pint with Walking Tree Brewery this weekend in celebration of the music festival’s fifth anniversary. Here’s your Five on Friday weekend update for the […]]]>
Five on Friday: weekend events at Stuart, Vero, PSL, Fort Pierce, more


Source link

]]>
https://www.esurfboardracks.com/weekend-events-in-stuart-vero-psl-fort-pierce-more/feed/ 0
Hydro Flask partners with the Surfrider Foundation https://www.esurfboardracks.com/hydro-flask-partners-with-the-surfrider-foundation/ https://www.esurfboardracks.com/hydro-flask-partners-with-the-surfrider-foundation/#respond Wed, 14 Jul 2021 15:59:18 +0000 https://www.esurfboardracks.com/hydro-flask-partners-with-the-surfrider-foundation/ Hydro Flask, an award-winning leader in high performance stainless steel vacuum flasks and a Helen of Troy Limited (NASDAQ: HELE) brand, is excited to announce its 2021 #RefillForGood campaign affirming the brand’s continued commitment to eliminate plastic at single use consumption and waste in the world. Hydro Flask launched its Refill For Good initiative in […]]]>

Hydro Flask, an award-winning leader in high performance stainless steel vacuum flasks and a Helen of Troy Limited (NASDAQ: HELE) brand, is excited to announce its 2021 #RefillForGood campaign affirming the brand’s continued commitment to eliminate plastic at single use consumption and waste in the world.

Hydro Flask launched its Refill For Good initiative in July 2020, enabling people around the world to choose reusable alternatives to single-use bottles and containers that pollute green spaces, water and landfills around the world. The ongoing campaign unites the brand with consumers to fight plastic waste through simple, achievable actions and positive ideas – shared by Hydro Flask’s Refill For Good Advocates community which includes professional athletes, ocean scientists and global thought leaders working to eliminate single-use plastics from the environment.

This year’s campaign kicks off with the limited edition #RefillForGood bottle, of which $ 100,000 of the profits from the bottle will be donated to the Surfrider Foundation as part of a one-year partnership to protect the ocean , waves and beaches of the world for everyone. Bottles are available in two sizes, 21 oz Standard Mouth and 32 oz Wide Mouth, in four water-inspired colors and are available for purchase from the official Hydro Flask website, www.hydroflask.com/ refill-for-good.

“We’re excited to kick off Plastic Free July with our renewed rallying cry to Make Good Change For Good Reasons and #RefillForGood,” said Indigo Teiwes, Director of Corporate Responsibility for the Housewares Division from Helen of Troy. “The increase in the consumption of single-use products during the pandemic means that it is more important than ever to move to a durable solution. Through #RefillForGood, Hydro Flask is committed to inspiring others to join us in doing our part for the planet and eliminating single-use plastics from our daily lives.

“Hydro Flask is proud to stand up for cleaner oceans, waves and beaches through this donation and our continued partnership with the Surfrider Foundation,” said Yorgos Makris, Director of Marketing for Hydro Flask. “Surfrider’s powerful global activist network is a perfect ally to further amplify the #RefillForGood movement while making a more meaningful difference. Together, we can help stop the tide of single-use plastic waste to preserve our green and blue spaces – enabling a healthier, happier and more fulfilling life outdoors for people around the world.

Hydro Flask’s contribution will support Surfrider’s Plastic Pollution Initiative, addressing the elimination of single-use plastics from marine environments through an arsenal of programs ranging from nationwide beach cleanups to education and raising awareness of Rise Above Plastics. The partnership will also help steer Surfrider’s plastics policy advocacy efforts and legislative campaigns at local, state and national levels.

“The Surfrider Foundation is proud to partner with Hydro Flask to strengthen our efforts to eliminate single-use plastic from the environment,” said Dr. Chad Nelsen, CEO of the Surfrider Foundation. “Surfrider’s global network of affiliates are working together to eliminate plastic pollution at the source by collecting data on plastic pollution during beach cleanups to inform official policy changes at the local, state, federal and international levels. . Here in the United States, our efforts to advance federal plastic pollution regulations, such as the Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act, are made possible through the support of our partners, like Hydro Flask. We look forward to mobilizing our common communities to take action to protect what we all love. “

“As we all head out and to the beach this summer, now is the time to act with more conscious choices. and the planetSaid professional surfer, chemist and Hydro Flask Refill For Good advocate, Dr Cliff Kapono, who also sits on the board of Surfrider Foundation. “Avoiding single-use water bottles and plastic containers is an easy step we can all take, especially when alternatives exist. As a Surfrider board member and longtime Hydro Flask fan, I am delighted to celebrate this partnership and help motivate others to make the change and to #RefillForGood.

About Surfrider Foundation

The Surfrider Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to the protection and enjoyment of the ocean, waves and beaches of our world, for all, through a powerful network. Founded in 1984 by a handful of visionary surfers in Malibu, Calif., The Surfrider Foundation today has over one million supporters, activists and members, with more than 170 volunteer-led student chapters and clubs across the United States. , and more than 700 victories protecting our coasts. Learn more at surfrider.org.

About Hydro Flask

Hydro Flask® is the leader in high performance insulated products that help people enjoy the things they love to do in the places they love to be. From the best-selling water bottle to sweet innovations like our Unbound Series ™ soft coolers and Journey Series ™ hydration packs, the deliciously simple designs and go-anywhere durability of Hydro Flask always deliver the perfect temperature when you need it. need it. Founded in 2009 in Bend, Oregon, Hydro Flask inspires active outdoor lives with two simple words: Let’s Go! Its charitable arm, Parks For All, supports the development, maintenance, restoration and accessibility of public green spaces so that people around the world can live healthier, happier and more fulfilled lives. To learn more about Hydro Flask, Parks for Everyone, and to view our full line of award-winning products, visit www.hydroflask.com.

About Helen of Troy Limited

Helen of Troy Limited is a leading global consumer products company providing creative solutions to its customers through a diverse portfolio of recognized and widely recognized brands including OXO, Hydro Flask, Vicks, Braun, Honeywell, PUR, Hot Tools and Drybar. We sometimes call these brands our leadership marks. All trademarks registered herein are owned by Helen of Troy Limited (or its affiliates) and / or are used under license from their respective licensors. For more information on Helen of Troy, please visit www.helenoftroy.com.


Source link

]]>
https://www.esurfboardracks.com/hydro-flask-partners-with-the-surfrider-foundation/feed/ 0
The 7 best beaches for surfing near New York https://www.esurfboardracks.com/the-7-best-beaches-for-surfing-near-new-york/ https://www.esurfboardracks.com/the-7-best-beaches-for-surfing-near-new-york/#respond Wed, 14 Jul 2021 14:03:45 +0000 https://www.esurfboardracks.com/the-7-best-beaches-for-surfing-near-new-york/ Whether you’re a seasoned surfer or looking to learn the sport, you don’t have to travel far from New York to ride waves. Coming up, we’ve rounded up the area’s seven best beaches for surfing, from the Rockaways, New York’s only legal surf beach, to the Long Island and Hamptons spots to the largest of […]]]>

Whether you’re a seasoned surfer or looking to learn the sport, you don’t have to travel far from New York to ride waves. Coming up, we’ve rounded up the area’s seven best beaches for surfing, from the Rockaways, New York’s only legal surf beach, to the Long Island and Hamptons spots to the largest of the Jersey Shore. We’ll also tell you other things to do in these towns and where to rent boards or take lessons.

NEW YORK

Photo by Lars Plowmann via

1. The Rockaways
The Rockaways are the only beach in New York where you can legally surf. It is accessible via the A train and the Rockaway S shuttle (it extends to connect with the A at Rockaway Boulevard in the summer), as well as the NYC Ferry. In recent years, it’s upped its cool factor with food trucks, bars (try Connolly’s for their famous pink lemonades and pina Coladas), taco stands (try Tacoway Beach), as well as a lively boardwalk and trendy hotels. . Beach 92nd Street, Beach 67th Street and Beach 69th Street are considered the best surfing beaches. The waves are usually two to three feet in length and tend to break steadily, making this a great place for beginners. Beach 92nd Street can have bigger waves, but also tends to be very crowded. If you are looking to take a lesson, Locals Surf School offers packages for individuals, couples or groups, as well as surf camps and children’s programs. Conatus Surf Club, Surfs Up NY, and Rockaway Surf School are other great options for lessons.

2. Long beach
Sean Collins, the senior surf weather forecaster for Surfline, told the Wall Street Journal that Long Beach’s overall appeal to surfing has to do with the Hudson Canyon submarine located at the western end of Long Island. “There are swells that don’t hit the canyon properly, so they come in normally,” he explained. multiply it. Probably the best surf spot is Lido Beach, where “southerly swells with northerly winds produce powerful, trough A-shaped peaks,” according to Surfline. Lincoln Boulevard, where the piers help produce consistent waves that are best for beginners, is a close second. Wherever you go on Long Beach be prepared for the summer crowds. Unsound surf shop and Long Beach Surf Shop are the places to go for board rentals, while Skudin Surf offers lessons.


Photo via PxHere

3. Montauk
Its location at the tip of Long Island gives Montauk some of the best and biggest waves in the area (as well as a long drive or down the Jitney). And although it has the loudest party scene in the Hamptons, the beaches and ocean still retain that laid-back fishing village feel. Ditch Plains is considered the best surf spot in Montauk and is arguably the best for experienced surfers. Due to its rocky bottom, the consistent break is often compared to spots in Southern California. Montauk Lighthouse (the oldest in the state) is not only a historic attraction, but also a landmark for some of the best surfing. To the south and west of the lighthouse is Turtle Cove, which can see waves of up to 20 feet in good weather. According to Surfline, Terrace is the beach where locals go. They explain, “its reef covered with sand [produces] some of Montauk’s only believable hits ”and it’s“ one of the best south-facing breaks on all of Long Island ”. Air + Speed ​​Surf Shop offers rentals, lessons and camps, and Sunset Surf Shack rents boards and wetsuits.


Photo by Pexels from Pixabay

4. Island of Fire
Of course, it takes some effort to get here – you’ll have to take the Long Island Railroad to Sayville Station, followed by a shuttle and ferry – but Fire Island is a magical, car-free place (the Most people walk, bike or golf cart) with plenty of protected beaches, resorts and outdoor activities (hiking and fishing are very popular). Technically a barrier island, Fire Island is good for surfing due to a series of sandbanks and jetties, but that also means conditions are a bit unpredictable and can change quickly depending on the location of the sandbanks. sand and the state of the break. “The best Sandbar breaks are at Atlantic, Point O ‘Woods and Smith Point. For a steeper, faster wave, surfers head to the piers at Ocean Beach. There is an east and west jetty, both with quality waves, ”explains fireisland.com. For board rental, go to Bungers in Sayville (before boarding the ferry).

NEW JERSEY

5. Sand hook
Sandy Hook is part of the Gateway National Recreation Area and is therefore maintained by the National Park Service. In addition to the pristine, rolling beaches, there are dune and beach trails for running and hiking, biking trails, kayaking, and even an old military installation (there’s also a nudist beach if that’s your thing. ). It is accessed via the high-speed Seastreak ferry, which adds another layer of ocean fun. The reason Sandy Hook is great for surfing is that its location at the northern tip of the Jersey Shore creates a classic point break. “Sandy Hook Creek is at the third pier… It faces northeast and mostly creates waves to the right, it’s at its best with a bigger swell from the south,” says Deep Swell. Plus, they say, “good sandbanks create hollow waves that break the beach.” Note that concessions are very limited, so most visitors bring a cooler.


Surfing in Belmar. Photo by Catherine E. Bailey via Flickr cc

6. Belmar
This Jersey Shore town gets inundated with tourists in the summer, as it has some of the area’s liveliest bars (D Jai’s and Bar Anticipation, in particular) and plenty of Airbnbs. In recent years, there has been a renaissance of the restaurant and the addition of the new BeachHaus Brewery. To catch the waves, head to the 16th Avenue beach, which “breaks pretty well on any swell and is a good place to catch if it’s not summer,” according to Surfline. Eastern Lines Surf Shop is right across the street and also offers surf lessons, as does the local Summertime Surf School. But keep in mind that Belmar can get excited in the height of summer. It is accessible via NJ Transit.


Waves breaking at Manasquan Inlet. Photo by apardavila via Flickr cc

7. Manasquan Inlet
Full Disclosure: The 6sqft editors are both from Manasquan, BUT this surf spot is known all over the country. The adorable coastal town, just one square mile with a quintessential Main Street USA vibe, has a full stretch of family-friendly beaches, but the Inlet is where you’ll catch the waves. Since there’s a very long pier here, you’ll get “some of the longest walks on the coast because the waves peak further,” according to app.com. Surfline explains that the entry “can handle faces up to 20ft, with two fast bowl-shaped picks and the occasional quality remaining.” The vibe is also desirable, as Mansaquan tends to be full of locals who all know each other. To pick up gear, head to the town’s long-standing surf shop, Inlet Outlet, or Brave New World across the Inlet in Point Pleasant. For a bite to eat there is Carlson’s Corner and the Riverside Cafe right by the creek. Summertime Surf also has lessons in Manasquan, but a really cool group is Pink Pineapple, a girls’ surf camp.

RELATED:

Keywords :
surfing



Source link

]]>
https://www.esurfboardracks.com/the-7-best-beaches-for-surfing-near-new-york/feed/ 0
Soft Surfboard Market Size 2021-2028 https://www.esurfboardracks.com/soft-surfboard-market-size-2021-2028/ https://www.esurfboardracks.com/soft-surfboard-market-size-2021-2028/#respond Wed, 14 Jul 2021 07:36:10 +0000 https://www.esurfboardracks.com/soft-surfboard-market-size-2021-2028/ New Jersey, United States, – The latest market report released by Market Research Intellect titled ‘Global Soft Surfboard Market’ presents an accurate analysis of the size, share, revenue, and estimated sales and distribution networks of the Global Soft Surfboard Market over the course of of the forecast period. The report offers a comprehensive overview of […]]]>

New Jersey, United States, – The latest market report released by Market Research Intellect titled ‘Global Soft Surfboard Market’ presents an accurate analysis of the size, share, revenue, and estimated sales and distribution networks of the Global Soft Surfboard Market over the course of of the forecast period. The report offers a comprehensive overview of the market, along with an accurate summary of the major regions of the market. Our team of analysts have thoroughly researched the existing competitive market landscape, focusing on leading companies and their business expansion strategies. The report ends with conclusive data offering useful information about the market growth at regional and global level.

The report draws the reader’s attention to the severe impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic on the Soft Surfboard industry and its vital segments and sub-segments. It details the adverse effects of the pandemic on the global economic scenario, as well as on this particular trade sphere. The report takes into account the main influencing factors influencing the current market performance of COVID-19. The market has been substantially affected by the pandemic and significant changes have been observed in market dynamics and demand trends. The report examines the main financial difficulties caused by the pandemic and offers a future assessment of the impact of COVID-19.

The market intelligence study guides the reader through the key parameters of the Soft Surfboard market including strengths and weaknesses of major players using analytical tools such as SWOT analysis and analysis Porter’s Five Forces. The report comprises a broad market segmentation based on various product types, a broad spectrum of applications, key regions, and existing competition among players.

Competition

The major players have been reviewed based on their company profile, capacity, product portfolio, product / service price, sales, and cost / benefit.

The research focuses on the current market size of the Soft Surfboard markets and its growth rates on the basis of the records with company highlights of key players / manufacturers:

Key players in the soft surfboards market:

  • Quiksilver
  • hobby
  • Rusty surfboards
  • Xanadu surfboards
  • Haydenshapes
  • surf boards
  • Firewire surfboards
  • Surftech
  • McTavish surfboards
  • Sports goalkeeper
  • True North Gear

Segmentation of the flexible surfboards market:

The global Soft Surfboard market report is divided by many aspects into respective segments and their sub-segments. Several possible, existing and previous growth trends for each segment and sub-segment are covered in the global Soft Surfboard Market. For the forecast period 2021-2028, the segment offers accurate forecast and calculations in terms of volume and value. This will allow the user to concentrate on the important segment of the market and the factors responsible for its growth in the Balance Charger market. The report also illustrates the factors responsible for the low or steady growth rate of other segments of the Soft Surfboard market.

Flexible Surfboards Market Breakdown By Type:

  • Polyurethane (PU) panels
  • Balsa planks
  • Hollow wood planks
  • Other

Soft Surfboards Market Split By Application:

  • Entertainment
  • Sport competition
  • Other

Scope of the Soft Surfboards Market Report

Report attribute Details
Market size available for years 2021 – 2028
Reference year considered 2021
Historical data 2015 – 2019
Forecast period 2021 – 2028
Quantitative units Revenue in millions of USD and CAGR from 2021 to 2027
Covered segments Types, applications, end users, etc.
Cover of the report Revenue forecast, company ranking, competitive landscape, growth factors and trends
Regional scope North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Middle East and Africa
Scope of customization Free customization of the report (equivalent to up to 8 working days for analysts) with purchase. Add or change the scope of country, region and segment.
Price and purchase options Take advantage of personalized shopping options to meet your exact research needs. Explore purchasing options

Regional Soft Surfboard Market Analysis can be represented as follows:

In addition to segmental breakdown, the report is strongly structured into a study by region. The researchers’ comprehensive regional analysis highlights key regions and their dominant countries accounting for a substantial share of the Neem mining market revenue. The study helps to understand how the market will perform in the respective region while also mentioning the emerging regions which growth is a significant CAGR. Here are the regions covered by this report.

Geographically, the global Soft Surfboard market has segmented as follows:

  • North America includes the United States, Canada and Mexico
  • Europe includes Germany, France, UK, Italy, Spain
  • South America includes Colombia, Argentina, Nigeria and Chile
  • Asia-Pacific includes Japan, China, Korea, India, Saudi Arabia and Southeast Asia

Visualize Soft Surfboards Market Using Verified Market Intelligence: –

Verified Market Intelligence is our BI platform to tell the story of this market. VMI provides in-depth predictive trends and accurate insights into over 20,000 emerging and niche markets to help you make key revenue impact decisions for a bright future.

VMI provides a comprehensive overview and global competitive landscape of regions, countries and segments, as well as key players in your market. Present your market reports and findings with built-in presentation capabilities, delivering over 70% of time and resources to investors, sales and marketing, R&D and product development. VMI supports data delivery in interactive Excel and PDF formats and provides over 15 key market indicators for your market.


The study thoroughly explores the profiles of the major market players and their main financial aspects. This comprehensive business analysis report is useful for all new entrants and new entrants as they design their business strategies. This report covers the production, revenue, market share and growth rate of the Soft Surfboard market for each key company, and covers the breakdown data (production, consumption, revenue and market share) by regions, type and applications. . Historical Soft Surfboard breakdown data from 2016 to 2020 and forecast to 2021-2029.

About Us: Market Research Intelligence

Market Research Intellect provides syndicated and personalized research reports to clients across various industries and organizations, in addition to the goal of providing personalized and in-depth research studies.

We talk about solutions for logical research, personalized consulting and data severity analysis across a range of industries including energy, technology, manufacturing and construction, chemicals and materials, food. and drinks. Etc. Our research studies help our clients make more data-driven decisions, admit push predictions, grossly capitalize on opportunities, and maximize efficiency by acting as their belt in crime to adopt a mention precise and indispensable without compromise.

After serving the pinnacle of over 5,000 clients, we have provided expert assertion research facilities to over 100 Global Fortune 500 companies such as Amazon, Dell, IBM, Shell, Exxon Mobil, General Electric, Siemens, Microsoft , Sony and Hitachi.

Contact us:

Mr. Edwyne Fernandes

United States: +1 (650) -781-480
UK: +44 (753) -715-0008
APAC: +61 (488) -85-9400
US Toll Free: +1 (800) -782-1768

Website: – https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/


Source link

]]>
https://www.esurfboardracks.com/soft-surfboard-market-size-2021-2028/feed/ 0
Lego Volkswagen T2 camper van goes on sale August 1 https://www.esurfboardracks.com/lego-volkswagen-t2-camper-van-goes-on-sale-august-1/ https://www.esurfboardracks.com/lego-volkswagen-t2-camper-van-goes-on-sale-august-1/#respond Wed, 14 Jul 2021 00:34:43 +0000 https://www.esurfboardracks.com/lego-volkswagen-t2-camper-van-goes-on-sale-august-1/ Fans of legendary Volkswagen vans, as well as those looking for something more spacious in an electric vehicle, have been eagerly awaiting the release of VW’s 2024 ID.Buzz Microbus. In the meantime, there’s still the idea of ​​building this nostalgic 60s T2 motorhome kit, which will be released at Lego on August 1st. The kit […]]]>
  • Fans of legendary Volkswagen vans, as well as those looking for something more spacious in an electric vehicle, have been eagerly awaiting the release of VW’s 2024 ID.Buzz Microbus.
  • In the meantime, there’s still the idea of ​​building this nostalgic 60s T2 motorhome kit, which will be released at Lego on August 1st.
  • The kit includes over 2000 pieces and includes a wrap-around windshield, sliding door, sunroof with tent and a pair of folding chairs.

    Fans of the VW Microbus – whether for its practical form, its status as a hippie icon from the ’60s and’ 70s, or its quirky personality – may already own a Lego version – the T1 Camper Van Kit (see below) , released several years ago. It is now joined by this T2 kit, representing the second generation of the van, which will be marketed on August 1. It should be a sensation among fans of the legendary Microbus. After all, they still have about two years to wait before they finally see the automaker’s ID.Buzz electric van on the market.

    LEGO Creator Expert Volkswagen T1 Camper Van 10220 Building Set (1334 Pieces)

    This set has a lot of the same combination of fun and functionality that was the hallmark of the current T2. It has functional steering, a wraparound windshield and a folding rear seat. The curtains are made of fabric. In the kitchen area, the cabinets and the fridge open, and there is a sink and a gas hob with a kettle on top. There is a retractable roof with tent. Accessory elements include folding chairs and a surfboard. The stickers are specific to the 1970s period, right down to the self-adhesive letters “LOVE”, and you can choose a German or American license plate.

    When assembled the Lego T2 is 13.5 inches long, 5.5 inches wide and 6.0 inches high, a good size for an office or home office. It will cost $ 179.99 and can be ordered from Lego.com.

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and uploaded to this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and other similar content on piano.io


Source link

]]>
https://www.esurfboardracks.com/lego-volkswagen-t2-camper-van-goes-on-sale-august-1/feed/ 0
Iconic Seal Beach sculptor Rich Harbor dies at 77 https://www.esurfboardracks.com/iconic-seal-beach-sculptor-rich-harbor-dies-at-77/ https://www.esurfboardracks.com/iconic-seal-beach-sculptor-rich-harbor-dies-at-77/#respond Tue, 13 Jul 2021 21:08:44 +0000 https://www.esurfboardracks.com/iconic-seal-beach-sculptor-rich-harbor-dies-at-77/ Rich Harbor passed away on July 11, 2021. Photo: Harbor Surfboards On Sunday, On July 11, Rich Harbor passed away at the age of 77 surrounded by family and friends at his Seal Beach home. The surf shop he opened on Main Street in 1962 still stands in its original location today, making it the […]]]>

Rich Harbor passed away on July 11, 2021. Photo: Harbor Surfboards


Inertia

On Sunday, On July 11, Rich Harbor passed away at the age of 77 surrounded by family and friends at his Seal Beach home. The surf shop he opened on Main Street in 1962 still stands in its original location today, making it the oldest surf shop of its kind, according to Harbor Surfboards.

Of all the stories the surfing world can tell about its most memorable shapers, Rich Harbor is as iconic as it gets. The surfboard shaper and longtime owner of Seal Beach debuted at just 16 years old. His own board was stolen and he had no other choice to get back into the water than to craft one. It was “terrible,” he once said. But surfboard number two wasn’t, and soon after, friends started asking Rich to make them too.

It was the spark for a Rich Harbor teenager to use his father’s name to get a $ 15 business license and get Harbor Surfboards off the ground. Harbor had notoriously marked that first plank with a “1” and made sure to add a number to every plank he had built since then. According to Orange County Register, the last board handcrafted by Harbor itself got number 32,680 in 2019.

Harbor’s legacy as a builder and businessman runs deeper than his six-decade-old boutique. The Harbor Surf Team was legendary, and Harbor itself will be remembered as a mentor to countless people who shaped the history of the sport. Dick Brewer, Robert August and Tim Stamps were just a few names who were part of the port staff at one point before going out on their own.

“It really was the fitness ‘dream team’, he said of building fitness stands and recruiting members for his fitness team in the 1960s. “It was the golden age of surfboard making.”

“I think he would say he lived a full life with no regrets and (he was) happy to have accomplished all he could,” said Robert Howson, longtime business partner. OC Register. Howson purchased and now operates the Harbor Surf Shop retail operation.

The community is still working on plans for a paddle celebration to honor the legend. Harbor is survived by his wife Helen Harbor, daughters Melissa Harbor-Hennessy and Carrie Harbor-Nolan, son Paul Lawler and five grandchildren.



Source link

]]>
https://www.esurfboardracks.com/iconic-seal-beach-sculptor-rich-harbor-dies-at-77/feed/ 0
Famous California surfboard maker Rich Harbor dies at 77 – Santa Cruz Sentinel https://www.esurfboardracks.com/famous-california-surfboard-maker-rich-harbor-dies-at-77-santa-cruz-sentinel/ https://www.esurfboardracks.com/famous-california-surfboard-maker-rich-harbor-dies-at-77-santa-cruz-sentinel/#respond Tue, 13 Jul 2021 12:03:12 +0000 https://www.esurfboardracks.com/famous-california-surfboard-maker-rich-harbor-dies-at-77-santa-cruz-sentinel/ When Rich Harbor’s surfboard was stolen from his backyard, the Seal Beach teen had no choice but to build another. It wasn’t long before the birth of Harbor Surfboards, its owner over the decades finding his way to become one of the most iconic surfboard makers in history, ultimately claiming to have the oldest surf […]]]>

When Rich Harbor’s surfboard was stolen from his backyard, the Seal Beach teen had no choice but to build another.

It wasn’t long before the birth of Harbor Surfboards, its owner over the decades finding his way to become one of the most iconic surfboard makers in history, ultimately claiming to have the oldest surf shop. active in its original location.

Harbor, 77, died on Sunday July 11, surrounded by family and friends at his Seal Beach home.

“I think he would say he lived a full life with no regrets and (he was) happy to have accomplished all he could,” said Robert Howson, longtime business partner, who bought and operates the Harbor Surf Shop retail operation.

Harbor started riding the waves at Seal Beach on an inflatable surf mat; it was her mother, Alice, who suggested she try a surfboard.

And once he did, he got hooked. But after that first plank was pulled from its yard, Harbor asked his father, who worked in the aerospace industry, to help him build a new one.

Soon friends wanted boards and he started his business by purchasing a permit for $ 15 from the town of Seal Beach on June 30, 1962. At only 16, he had to put his father’s name on it.

Harbor included a 1 on his first board, and each one he built over the next six decades got a number – the last board he created in 2019 was sold to a fan in Japan, who got the number 32 680.

Harbor was one of the first board makers to start with heavy lumber and switched to foam when the lighter material started to become more popular.

Over the decades, renowned shapers such as Mike Marshall, Dale Velzy and most recently Tim Stamps have fashioned under the Harbor label before going on their own.

“I think he was such a father to everyone, not just his own family. He was such a father figure to everyone who came here, to everyone who worked for him, to everyone who knew him, ”said his daughter Melissa Harbor-Hennessy. “I only realized later in my life that I shared it with so many people. Everyone constantly said how much they looked at him for advice, guidance, and direction, in life, and he gave it to them. It was really special, and it continues with everyone. They all have a piece of him.

Howson said Harbor was an incredibly generous man – with his time, his expertise and his general knowledge. Hot dog surfers from the Long Beach, Seal Beach and Huntington area became members of its elite surf team in the 60s and 70s, proudly wearing the team jacket and representing the store at competitions.

“He’s really mentored a lot of these people, these kids,” said Howson, himself a former team Harbor rider. “I don’t think any of them will ever forget coming into contact with Rich Harbor, ever.”

Harbor was one of the few in its time to withstand waves of change in the surfing world: the shortboard revolution that retired competitors and friends, the sudden shutdown of blanket maker Clark Foam in 2005 which crippled the industry and several economic downturns. .

Harbor had fans from all over the world and a cult following among surfboard enthusiasts, some who gathered over the years at Harbor Surf Days to ride the waves at Bolsa Chica State Beach and share stories on their boards, both historical and new.

Before health problems started to take their toll, Harbor showed up with her camera, a surfing celebrity sitting in her beach chair on the sand, snapping photos of people enjoying her creations.

“He was more than a surfboard shaper, he made it to everyone,” Harbor-Hennessy said. “Everyone admired and loved him for it. “


Source link

]]>
https://www.esurfboardracks.com/famous-california-surfboard-maker-rich-harbor-dies-at-77-santa-cruz-sentinel/feed/ 0